Metering

Requesting an extra reading

Simply Energy can reissue a substituted or estimated bill with a bill based on a customer read. This is only done when there is a marked difference between what you have been billed for, and what you advise the meter is reading at that point in time.

For a bill to be issued based on a customer read, the difference between the Estimated/Substituted read and the customer read must be more than 150 units for Electricity and 100 units for Gas.

Special Check Read

If you are unhappy with an actual read, a special check can be requested by you at your own cost. Based on this special check reading, any difference between your consumption and the amount charged on your bill can be reconciled to ensure that you only pay for the energy you have actually consumed over the course of the billing period. Alternatively, you can wait until your next bill where you will see any variance rectified.

How is consumption measured?

Whether its electricity or gas, you will have a meter at your property to measure and record the amount of energy you have used. Electricity is measured in kilo Watt hours (kWh) and gas in mega joules (MJ). A meter reader from the local network distributor in your area will usually come out and read your meter, and it's these reads that we use to prepare your energy bills. In instances where we are not provided with actual meter reads from the distributor we may need to use an estimate or substituted meter read until we are supplied with the actual meter read by the distributor but we will tell you on your bills.

For interval electricity meters, reads are obtained remotely via a communication network. There may be times a meter reader from the local network distributor in your area will have to attend the site to extract the data.

To find out the read type used for your Simply Energy bill, simply check the bill reference letter next to the reading. For further information, please refer to How To Read your Bill.

Requesting Metering or Billing Information

Customer Request
Residential and Small to Medium business customers can request their metering or billing information for the last two years. To request this information, please provide your information so Simply Energy can confirm authority to obtain this information.

Customer Type  Information required
Residential Customer Name, address, DOB, the date range (within the last two years) and, if you have it, the NMI/MIRN you require the data for.
Small to Medium   Business Customers Business Name, ABN, your name, business address, the date range (within the last two years) and, if you have it, the NMI/MIRN you require the data for.

The NMI/MIRN  can be found on your bill, on the second page above your usage information.

You can request your data by email or by phone.
Email: info@simplyenergy.com.au
Phone: 13 88 08

For help with the technical information in the detailed report, view the NEM12 Retail User Guide

For Victorian customers, if you need the information for use with the Victorian Energy Compare website, please include this in your request so we can make sure the correct format is provided.

3rd Party Requests
To obtain metering or billing information on behalf of a customer, download and complete the below form and email the request to MDRequest@simplyenergy.com.au. This form will need to be completed and scanned for each customer. 

View the Authorised Representative Form

Please describe, in Section 5 of the form, the information you are requesting. Please use a description from the following list:
• Victorian Energy Compare smart meter file electricity format
• Metering Data Provision Procedures (AEMO) electricity format
• Gas information

Commercial and Industrial Metering or Billing Information
If you are a Commercial and Industrial business customer, please use SERVO, our C&I account portal.

What are Service Order Charges?

Simply Energy can help you organise energy connection, disconnection, meter addition and meter alteration etc. All distributor charges are generally passed on to you on your next energy bill. You may also be charged an administration fee to organise such requests.

What is a contract termination fee?

A contract termination fee is a fee for terminating a fixed-term contract before the contract expiry date. You are advised of the amount of any contract termination fee at the time of entering into a fixed term contract. If you cancel a fixed term contract with us a contract termination fee may be applied to your final bill.

What is a MIRN?

Your MIRN is the Meter Identification Reference Number for gas. Every home and business with a gas supply has a unique number. This number is used to track your usage and used when changing retailers. You will find it on your Simply Energy bill on the top section of the back page.

How do I arrange a special meter reading?

We would be happy to arrange an appointment for a special meter reading at your premises. This can take place anytime during business hours, Monday to Friday.

Please contact 13 88 08 (from 8.30am to 5.30pm AEST Monday to Friday) to arrange a convenient date to allow us access to your meter. We require you to give us at least 10 business days notice to arrange an appointment.

Please be advised there is a fee associated with this type of reading.

How to read your electricity meter

Electricity meter technology has been changing from mechanical to electronic and when new meters are installed they are generally electronic. At the same time, a large number of older premises still have mechanical meters, which can be analogue or odometer types.

How you read your electricity meter depends on its type. Analogue and odometer types show the total quantity of electricity that has passed through the meter using a dial or odometer-type display.

You can calculate the amount of electricity you have consumed since your last bill by deducting the reading shown on your last bill from the current reading displayed on the meter.

Reading electronic meters is more complex because it depends on the specific meter and how it has been set up. More information about reading electronic meters is provided in the electronic meter section below.

Odometer-(cyclometer) type electricity meters

This type of meter has a mechanical display that shows the quantity of electricity consumed as a number. An example of this type of display, which is similar to a car's odometer, is shown below. These meters display the quantity of electricity in kilowatt-hours (kWh). This example shows a meter reading of 92,992 kWh.

Some meters of this type have two displays. One is labelled as ‘H’ and the other as ‘L’. The H display shows the quantity of energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those appliances connected to the L display. The L display is usually dedicated to a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating).

Odometer-(cyclometer) type electricity meters

Electronic electricity meters

Electronic electricity meters generally have rectangular plastic cases with a digital liquid crystal display (LCD) that looks similar to the display on a pocket calculator.

This display generally shows one item of information (known as a ‘register’) at a time, along with a code or other indication that relates to the register. Pressing a ‘scroll’ or ‘display’ button on the front of the meter switches between the different registers.

An example of an electronic meter is shown below.

EMS2100 Electronic Meter

If all your energy is charged at the same rate, and you do not have any separately metered loads (such as electric hot water heating or electric space heating) or a solar photovoltaic (PV) panel system, then you can read your electronic meter by scrolling the display until it shows the total or peak register. This register is identified by a code number. See the table below for a guide to Electronic meter register code numbers.

You can calculate the amount of electricity you have consumed since your last bill by deducting the reading shown on your last bill from the current reading displayed on the meter for the appropriate register.

Information for customers with separately metered loads (such as electric hot water heating or electric space heating) or a solar photovoltaic (PV) panel system is provide in the sections that follow.

Peak and off-peak meters and time-of-use meters

The cost of purchasing electricity and delivering it to customers’ premises varies. It is generally more expensive at times when large numbers of customers are consuming high amounts. In southern Australia this is often on hot summer weekdays when many air conditioners are switched on.

Some tariffs charge different prices for electricity at different times, to reflect the different costs of the electricity. These tariffs charge a lower price at off-peak times, such as late at night and early in the morning. These tariffs require metering that can measure how much electricity is used at different times.

There are a number of ways that metering can be set up to measure consumption at different times. These include the following:

  • Separate meters for peak and off-peak loads
  • A single meter that can separately measure peak and off-peak loads. This is referred to as a meter with two registers
  • A single meter that can measure and record how much electricity is used in each half-hour (for example) of every day. This is referred to as a time-of-use meter.

Separate peak and off-peak meters

One meter is the primary meter (peak meter) and it measures the energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those connected to the off-peak meter. The peak meter records all usage by these appliances 24 hours a day.

The off-peak meter is usually dedicated to a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating). This load is switched on and off by a time switch or by signals sent to the switching device. Time switches are often set to turn on after 11:00 PM and turn off before 7:00 AM.

Separate peak and off-peak meters are generally mechanical meters (round dial or odometer (cyclometer) types). See the Analogue (round dial) electricity meters and Odometer (cyclometer) electricity meters sections above.

Meters with two registers

Some mechanical odometer (cyclometer) type meters have two displays. One is labelled as ‘H’ and the other as ‘L’. The H display shows the quantity of energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those appliances connected to the L display. The L display is usually dedicated to a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating). See the Odometer (cyclometer) electricity meters section above.

Some electronic meters have two registers (one for peak consumption and one for off-peak consumption).

These may be set up in two different ways: the method used reflects the structure of your tariff. In one way the meter is set up to record consumption by all appliances at peak times (such as 7:00 AM to 11:00 PM) in the first register and to record consumption by all appliances at off-peak times (such as 11:00 PM to 7:00 AM) in the second register.

Alternatively the meter can be set up to measure usage in the same way as separate peak and off-peak meters. When set up this way, the first register records measures the energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those connected to the off-peak register. The first register records all usage by these appliances 24 hours a day. The second register records usage by a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating).

Time-of-use meters

Time-of-use (TOU) electronic meters record the electricity consumed in each half-hour interval (for example) of every day.

TOU meters generally have two or more registers. Each register is identified by a code number. See the table below for a guide to Electronic meter register code numbers.

Some TOU meters are read by a meter reader who visits the premises and extracts consumption data from the meter. These are called ‘manually-read interval meters’. Other TOU meters are remotely read, using radio or mobile phone technology. These are called ‘remotely-read interval meters’.

Smart meters and advanced meters

Smart meters and advanced meters are electronic remotely-read interval meters that have additional functions as well as metering. An example of an additional function is remote control of the power supply to your premises. This enables the power supply to be turned off and on without the power company having to send a technician to your premises. This can be used to assist in the management of emergencies, for example

Solar meters

Metering for customers that have solar panels installed is more complicated than for other customers. This is because the meter must measure and record the energy provided by the customer to the electricity grid (export energy) separately to the energy provided by the electricity grid to the customer (import energy).

Due to this complexity solar customers are usually provide with an electronic meter with a digital liquid crystal display (LCD) that looks similar to the display on a pocket calculator.

This display generally shows one item of information (known as a ‘register’) at a time, along with a code or other indication that relates to the register. Pressing a ‘scroll’ or ‘display’ button on the front of the meter switches between the different registers.

The total energy imported from the grid is stored in the import register, and the total energy exported to the grid is stored in the export register.

Each register is identified by a code number. See the table below for a guide to Electronic meter register code numbers.

Electronic meter register code numbers

Some register code numbers for distributors’ meters (single phase) are provided below

Distributor Meter First Import (consumption) Register Number Export (if feeding solar energy into the grid) Register Number Other registers
Australian Capital Territory
ActewAGL 2 register 03 N/A 07 (off-peak energy)
TOU 04 11 05 (shoulder energy), 06 (off-peak energy)
New South Wales
Ausgrid All except gross-metered solar 03 (total energy) 93 (net energy) 07 (off-peak energy)
Gross-metered solar 83 (gross energy) 73 (gross energy) 03 (total (net) energy import), 07 (off-peak energy import), 93 (net energy export)
Endeavour
Essential EM1000 A (peak energy) Minus sign(-) (net energy) B (shoulder energy), C (off-peak energy)
EM1210 01 (peak energy) 73 (gross energy) 02 (shoulder energy), 03 (off-peak energy)
i-Credit 500B 01 (peak energy) 15 (net export) 02 (shoulder energy), 03 (off-peak energy), 90 (second circuit such as hot water or slab heating)
Queensland
Energex EM1000 No register number (blank) (total energy) Minus sign(-) A (peak energy), B (shoulder energy), C (off-peak energy)
EM1200 and EDMI Atlas 01 (total energy) 40 05 (peak energy), 10 (shoulder energy), 20 (off-peak energy), 30 (second circuit such as hot water or slab heating)
Ergon EM1000 No register number (blank) (total energy) Minus sign(-) N/A
EM1200 06 (total energy) 07 04 (peak energy), 05 (off-peak energy), 09 (second circuit such as hot water or slab heating)
MK 10 003 (total energy) 114 004 (peak energy), 005 (shoulder energy), 006 (off-peak energy)
Q4 Meter 003 (total energy) 114 004 (peak energy), 005 (shoulder energy), 006 (off-peak energy), 115 (peak export), 116 (shoulder export), 117 (off-peak export)
South Australia
SA Power 2 register and 03 (peak energy) 09 07 (off-peak energy)
Networks solar
Victoria
Ausnet Services AMI 03 (total energy) 13 04 (peak energy) and 06 (off-peak energy)
Citipower and Powercor AMI 03 (primary circuit) 05 07 (second circuit such as hot water or slab heating)
Jemena AMI      
United Energy AMI      

How to read your gas meter

The numbers on your gas meter's display show the total volume of gas that has passed through the meter.

You can calculate the amount of gas you have consumed since your last bill by deducting the reading shown on your last bill from the current reading displayed on the meter.

Most gas meters display the volume of gas in cubic metres. This type of meter has a mechanical display that shows the volume of gas as a number. An example of this type of display, which is similar to a car's odometer, is shown below. This example shows a meter reading of 2,932 cubic metres of gas. Only black and white digits are read. If there are red digits then ignore them, as they are used for testing purposes only.

Some premises have a different type of meter, which displays the volume of gas using a series of dials. Each dial is numbered from 0 to 9. These meters display the volume of gas in cubic feet. An example of this type of display is shown below. This example shows a meter reading of 3,032,000 cubic feet. 100 cubic feet is equivalent to 2.83 cubic metres.

  Metric gas meter Imperial gas meter
Usage for gas connections Frequently used Rarely used
Readings Metric Gas Meter Imperial Gas Meter

Only read the first four dials, starting from the left. If there are any additional dials then ignore them. If the hand on a dial is between two numbers, then the lower number is used for the reading, except when the hand is between zero and nine, which is read as a nine.

How do we know which meter is yours?

Gas and electricity meters have both numbers and unique identifiers. The electricity meter identifier is called the National Metering Identifier, or NMI. Records of all NMIs are held in a database and if you change your electricity retailer the database is updated to show this change to the NMI. There is a similar arrangement for gas meters. They have a Metering Installation Registration Number or MIRN. These unique identifiers, or meter numbers, should be on your bill.

How are meters read?

Most electricity and gas meters are read by electricity and gas distributors—these are the companies that own the electricity poles and wires, the gas pipes, and the meters themselves. The distributors send the meter data to the electricity and gas retailers — so the retailers can bill their customers. As well as distributors, some specialist businesses provide and read electricity meters on behalf of retailers and their customers.

Clear Access to the Meter

While some new meters, such as the Victorian Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) meters, are read remotely using radio or mobile phone technology, most meters are read manually. Clear access to these meters is needed to allow the meter reader to read them. If there are access issues relating to your electricity or gas meters please discuss this with the Simply Energy team.

How do we know that meters are accurate?

There are Australian Standards for meter accuracy. Meters can be tested against these standards. Generally, if the meter is found to be operating within the requirements of the Standards, the customer has to pay for the meter test. If the meter is found not to be meeting the Standards, the company pays for the test and amends your bills. Most testing finds that meters are operating within Standards.

Why are some bills estimated?

Electricity, gas and water companies are allowed to estimate your bill if a meter reading is not available. Electricity and gas companies have to use their 'best endeavours' to read your meter at least once every 12 months. Estimated electricity bills are more common than gas or water bills—probably because electricity meters can be harder to access. Some are inside older houses. Most are on the front of the building itself, whereas water and gas meters are generally at the front of the property. Locked gates, high fences or dogs can all block meter access, leading to estimated bills. As a customer, you have to provide access for your meter to be read